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guidance on ingredient selection  

advice summary colour key :

Formulator should optimise during product design means that, although there are adequate margins of safety for both humans and the
environment, the formulator should optimise the use of each ingredient to produce the most sustainable formulation for the cleaning task.
Guidance highlighted in amber means that there are important choices to be made.
Guidance highlighted in red means that these ingredients should not be used.
 
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advice summary
Phosphates
Formulator should optimise during product design
Phosphonates
Formulator should optimise during product design
Anionic surfactants
Cationic surfactants
Amphoteric surfactants
Non-ionic surfactants
Formulator should optimise during product design
Oxygen-based bleaching agents
Formulator should optimise during product design
Chlorine-based bleaching agents
Formulator should optimise during product design
EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) and its salts
Use should be justified for specific applications
function and issues EDTA is used as a 'chelating agent' to tie up metal impurities in water, stopping them reducing cleaning efficiency. EDTA is poorly biodegradable and little removed by sewage treatment plants, but degrades steadily, if slowly, in the environment. There has been concern that it could remobilise heavy metals into the aquatic environment, allowing them to enter water supplies or the food chain.
guidance for procurement Although the EU Existing Chemicals risk assessment considers EDTA to be poorly biodegradable, it concludes that there is no risk for the aquatic environment from detergent uses that discharge to municipal sewer, nor from remobilisation of heavy metals. Only discharges without adequate treatment after use in large food plants were a potential concern. However, more biodegradable alternatives are now available that perform adequately, and industry has been able to improve sustainability by substituting EDTA in all bar a few specialist applications.
 
NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid)
and its salts
Consider using alternatives where exposure is less controlled
Phenols and halogenated phenols
Only ingredients that continue to be supported under the Biocidal Products Directive (BPD) should be used
Paradichlorobenzene
Should not be used
Aromatic hydrocarbons
Use should be justified for specific applications
Aliphatic hydrocarbons
Use should be justified for specific applications
Halogenated hydrocarbons
Use should be justified for specific applications
Soap
Formulator should optimise during product design
Zeolites
Formulator should optimise during product design
Polycarboxylates
Formulator should optimise during product design
Enzymes
Formulator should optimise during product design
Disinfectants / biocides
Only ingredients that continue to be supported under the BPD should be used
Optical brighteners
Formulator should optimise during product design
Perfumes, including phthalates & musks
Nitro-musks in products should be substituted
Alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs)
Cleaning products containing APEs should not be used
Preservatives
Only ingredients that continue to be supported under the BPD should be used
Colouring agents
Formulator should optimise during product design
VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds)
Low VOC products should be preferred where possible
Glycol ethers
Formulator should optimise during product design