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guidance on ingredient selection  

advice summary colour key :

Formulator should optimise during product design means that, although there are adequate margins of safety for both humans and the
environment, the formulator should optimise the use of each ingredient to produce the most sustainable formulation for the cleaning task.
Guidance highlighted in amber means that there are important choices to be made.
Guidance highlighted in red means that these ingredients should not be used.
 
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advice summary
Phosphates
Formulator should optimise during product design
Phosphonates
Formulator should optimise during product design
Anionic surfactants
Cationic surfactants
Amphoteric surfactants
Non-ionic surfactants
Formulator should optimise during product design
Oxygen-based bleaching agents
Formulator should optimise during product design
Chlorine-based bleaching agents
Formulator should optimise during product design
EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) and its salts
Use should be justified for specific applications
NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid)
and its salts
Consider using alternatives where exposure is less controlled
Phenols and halogenated phenols
Only ingredients that continue to be supported under the Biocidal Products Directive (BPD) should be used
Paradichlorobenzene
Should not be used
Aromatic hydrocarbons
Use should be justified for specific applications
Aliphatic hydrocarbons
Use should be justified for specific applications
Halogenated hydrocarbons
Use should be justified for specific applications
Soap
Formulator should optimise during product design
Zeolites
Formulator should optimise during product design
Polycarboxylates
Formulator should optimise during product design
Enzymes
Formulator should optimise during product design
Disinfectants / biocides
Only ingredients that continue to be supported under the BPD should be used
Optical brighteners
Formulator should optimise during product design
Perfumes, including phthalates & musks
Nitro-musks in products should be substituted
function and issues Perfumes are used at low levels (<1%) in cleaning products. Concerns are sometimes expressed about the biodegradability, potential bioaccumulation or endocrine disrupting potential of particular ingredients used in such perfumes, including phthalates and musks. Phthalates are used as solvents for other perfume ingredients and musks provide important components of many aromas.
guidance for procurement Some components of perfumes are poorly biodegradable and potentially bioaccumulative. Certain ingredients that may pose a risk (e.g. nitro-musks) have been, or are being, phased out. The principal polycyclic musks have been shown by HERA risk assessments and SCCP opinions to be safe for both human health and the environment. Cleaning products account for an extremely small proportion of total phthalate use and exposure. The phthalates used (mainly diethyl phthalate) have been assessed by the SCCP as safe for use in cosmetics and use in cleaning products should pose no significant risks.
 
Alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs)
Cleaning products containing APEs should not be used
Preservatives
Only ingredients that continue to be supported under the BPD should be used
Colouring agents
Formulator should optimise during product design
VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds)
Low VOC products should be preferred where possible
Glycol ethers
Formulator should optimise during product design